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Their smack-in-the-center, sensitive, compromising natures would have given them an edge in keeping a relationship healthy."In studies of marital satisfaction, middle children fare best all around," says Dr. Even so, if both of you tend to be the secretive type, you could have difficulty communicating.Relationship Tip: Try to figure out which of you is best at certain tasks (such as handling money or making decisions about the children), and then own up to that responsibility, rather than assuming the other will take care of it.Onlies with Anyone Unlike the other birth-order positions, only children haven't been studied as much, says Dr. "Most people assume an only child will resemble a firstborn in relationships," since they are, after all, first, but that doesn't take into account the fact that an only never had an advisory (or bossy! An only with a firstborn can be a good match if the only child acts less classically "firstborn." And an only with the lastborn can present issues, says Dr.Only Children The stereotype about only children is that they are pampered and precious, and thus will have trouble ceding the spotlight to anyone. The ultimate political power couple, two firstborns, is a classic combination of control, dominance and striving.

"Middleborns are the Type O blood of relationships: They go with anyone," says Dr. As a general rule, middles tend to be good at compromise—a skill valuable to them as they negotiated between bossy older sibs and needy younger ones.

Says Cane, "Firstborns like to be in control." As with all birth-order positions, gender plays a role, too.

In the case of firsts, oldest sons tend to be take-charge types, leaders.

Of course, a lot depends on how domineering the firstborn partner is, and how "classic" the middle child's accommodating personality is.

Remember, such variables as gender and age spacing play a role in how close your personality hews to the birth-order line, says Dr. A middle child with close-in-age older and younger siblings is more "middle-ish" than one whose younger or older sibs are years apart.